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Carriage Museum Postings If you visit a carriage museum, a private collection or anywhere else where horse drawn vehicles are housed and displayed then please put the link here. If you take photographs and acquire information during your visit share what you have with other forum members. If you see an interesting wagon, cart or carriage outside a dinner, a pub or a petrol station take a picture, get whatever information you can and post it here. ~jraah~

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Old 4th September 2015, 10:31 AM
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Default cobb&co coach

original cobb&co coach in Melbourne museum , only got 2 photos .
jason
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Old 4th September 2015, 09:03 PM
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If your interested in the history and the workings of Cobb & Co, then these two books should definitely be on your list to purchase.
There is enough information and original photo's with-in these two books, to be able to recreate a model with reasonable accuracy, well worth purchasing these to expand your knowledge base on this subject.

This first book will even have an accurate scale drawing of an original coach with-in it, you can make a model, or even a full sized vehicle from this drawing, as it has the measurements drawn on it. This is a folded up drawing, added to the rear pages.

http://www.shop.qm.qld.gov.au/cobban...ueensland.html

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/A-PICTORI...item3aaef61ef5


regards greenie
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Old 22nd September 2015, 11:57 AM
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Those two books are a great resource, but...

Ken Austin took a few liberties with the first book, when recounting some stories that happened with some passengers...

and the second book's plans, whilst valuable and accurate, and are well worth having, are of a coach that had been cut down to beocme a drover's waggonette, then was bought back, anc converted back. The builder, Col Ferguson, took a few liberties of his own in the conversion, hence it has very straight sides, instead of the bowed sides and bent uprights it originally would have had in the back of the body.

But for undercarriage information, and the driver's seat part, it is all totally accurate!
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Old 22nd September 2015, 12:01 PM
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The photos at the top, are of a particularly Victorian style of the coach ('Victorian,' as in the State in Australia) - look at the number of panels below the driver's seat, and notice also the driver's seat is in front of the front of the main enclosed part, rather than back against it.

The further north they were built, the fewer panels there seemed to be below the driver's seat. (I have no idea why, but it's just something I've noted over the years, studying scores and scores of them.

Many Queensland coaches had no door, as this one also doesn't have.
It would have to be a 17 passenger coach - 3 on each of 3 inside seats, plus 3 on the roof at the front, ditto at the back, and 2 beside the driver. 17 is a bit of a rarity.

The Melbourne museum used to have a Concord Jack coach on display (in the 1980s) - I wonder what happened to it?

Thanks for the photos!
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Last edited by Stewey; 22nd September 2015 at 12:07 PM.
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Old 22nd September 2015, 12:24 PM
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Take a close look at the first of those photos - it shows a typical problem with the earlier coaches:

The back window sills appear to be leaning uphill, while the front window sill looks to be leaning the other way. As if the coach has fractured in the middle, and it's heaved upwards a bit.

Some other coaches had ironwork added underneath, later to try and strengthen a bit of a design fault - if you look at enough of them you can see which were built more strongly, and which were remedied later on.

I tried to build the appropriate strength into the one we built, before the problem could even think about starting. You make the body bottom sides into a sort-of I-beam of timber, running right through from the back to the front, with no cuts in it. That means passengers have to step OVER the floor and lower body side to get out. The weaker coach bodies had a full-depth door hole, and that's where the problems began... and you can tell bu the extra internal bracing often drawn in on plans.
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Old 2nd October 2015, 01:58 PM
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Looks like it has two brake levers. Do not recall ever seeing one with two.

Just checked my pictures. Found others with two brake levers. Guess there were specific models made for steep terain.
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Last edited by Chuck; 2nd October 2015 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 4th October 2015, 12:52 PM
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In Australia, I think just about EVERY coach had two brake pedals/levers.
In the event of an emergency, the driver could count on a passenger also lending their weight to the other pedal- besides it gives you something to hold onto when getting in or out on either side...
and if one pedal should break, you still had the other side;s one, though I never heard of one breaking.
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Old 17th April 2017, 12:44 AM
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Danny Vadas Danny Vadas is offline
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I think you're right Stewey. All the pics I've seen of Cobb & Co coaches have two brake levers. Perhaps some of the first Concords to arrive in Australia had only the one brake lever?

This site might be of use - it shows some of the restoration of several Cobb & Co coaches : https://www.cobbandco.net.au/gallery/restoration

Cheers, Danny

Last edited by Danny Vadas; 17th April 2017 at 12:53 AM.
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