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Help, Tips and Ideas. You may be a novice, you may be an experienced model maker; but if you are looking for advice and help on anything at all, this is the place to ask. It doesn’t matter if you think it is a daft and trivial questions, please don’t be afraid to ask! Likewise, if you have a particular way of producing scale nuts and bolts, getting timber to size, silver soldering or bending metal to shape etc, then get your idea in here. Each and everyone of us are never to old to learn something new! ~~ jraah ~~

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Old 8th June 2017, 04:39 PM
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Default Jacob's hitch

Does anyone have details of a Jacob's hitch? I have searched the Internet and my books without success.
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Old 8th June 2017, 10:41 PM
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Simmy, are you talking about a type of knot?
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Old 9th June 2017, 02:00 PM
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No Bill. It is a type of arrangement seen on some forecarriages. On most vehicles the kingpin around which the forecarriage rotates passes through the front axle. However, on some vehicles the axle is in front of the kingpin which means the axle is not fixed in position. To overcome this a Jacob's hitch is used. I think it is a metal part which attaches to the axle and anchors it to the forecarriage body.
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Old 9th June 2017, 11:33 PM
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I know what you are talking about now. I have seen this on American light wagons and buggies. All have cast fifth wheels which strap on top of the axle. On some the kingpin is in front of the axle and others in back of the axle. Supposedly it has something to do with tracking.I have not heard of it being named.
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Old 10th June 2017, 05:09 PM
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Would this be what you are talking about? Although it appears the axle is behind the kingpin not in front as you mentioned.

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Last edited by Chuck; 10th June 2017 at 05:11 PM.
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Old 14th June 2017, 12:14 AM
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The purpose of Jacob's Lock, as it is called, is to make a shorter wheel turn compared with normal placing of the kingbolt over the axle.
I am just preparing a short article about the search for the London Bow Coal Wagon who had such steering system in which the front
wheels are not twisting around but gliding from the left to the right.
With this Coal Wagon it was a necessity because the front wheels were so high.
The backdraw of the system is that the front wheels are rolling forward unstable so with any hole or obstaclre on the pavement the shaft or pole will clap out, not very pretty for the poor horse(es).
What is shown here above with the luxary vehicles like buggies and town carriages with the kingpin forward of the axle is just for the reason that the shaft is stabelised and in fact the carriage goes straight foreward by it self and even so the horse has to push a bit harder against the shafts to make a turn. That is not only pleasant for the horse but also for the passenger(s) than the carriage will not make swinging movements.
If one looks to the trail left with steel rims on the pavement by a carriage and it is bolt upright one can be sure the pin is placed forward of the axle.

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Old 14th June 2017, 05:04 PM
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Thanks yor the replies. Chuck the example is what I was thinking of. Frits, you are right with the name I got it wrong. It is 'lock' not 'hitch'. Please Frits do you have any drawings as examples/
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