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Progression of a model This section was very popular in the previous forum and lots of very interesting posts soon built up in it. Please open this post and read more……~~ jraah ~~

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Old 1st June 2008, 09:12 AM
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Default Progression: Studebaker Sprinkler Wagon ca 1910.

In days gone by, sprinkler wagons were used to wet down the dust of the roads. Studebaker was the leading seller of Sprinkler Wagons by 1910.
In the 1870's Studebaker and Wrinkler Brothers both of South Bend Indiana were the most active in producing Sprinklers. They were used for watering streets, parks, racetracks, gardens, lawns and plants.
Their size ranged from 175 to 1000 gal. The most popular were in the 250 to 750 gal. sizes. The Sprinklers were fitted with a fifth wheel that balanced the tank and allowed 90 -degree turns. They weighed from 2,300 lbs. - 3600 lbs. empty. The Studebaker Sprinkler, considered top of the line, featured an assembly that could deliver a spray 30 feet in width and adjust to eight different volumes from light to heavy. Studebaker Sprinkler tanks were made of Tidewater Cypress in a horseshoe shape (circular on top, flat on the bottom).
In 1899 Studebaker purchased the Wrinkler system for the sum of $25,000.
(http://www.morvenpark.org/carspwagon.html)
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I found these plans online at wilhorsebooks.com and simply had to buy them. However, I soon realised the challenges posed by 1. working from Ivan Collins’ plans, (he did not draw them for resale and some of the details are missing) and 2. not being able to see/touch the actual vehicle. I started my research in 2005 (whilst still busy with other models).


Studebaker Sprinkler Wagon model built by Ivan Collins

The internet is a wonderful place, pity there are so many schmucks on it too. No-one I contacted wanted to help me. In fact, most people I emailed simply ignored my requests for information. I was very happy when, after enquiring about a wagon I saw on his site (www.placesearth.com), Kenneth Larson mailed back and said he might be going that way again sometime and, IF he did go, he’d take some more photos for me.

Time went by (so much time that I had almost shelved the plans as undoable) when I received mail from Ken. He’d taken and posted some photos for me! (1 year 10 months later). I was ecstatic that he had remembered.

I completed my Helgoland ship model and started on the Studebaker Sprinkler Wagon on 5 May 2008. (Yes, greenie, I will keep a time log so that I will know EXACTLY how long the model took to complete This time does not include research time).

Bearing in mind that I (1) work a full day, and (2) am a competitive cyclist (and training takes a lot of my time), time is limited and I have to balance my life carefully. I am fortunately married to an angel.

I took the plans and, copying them at 80%, scaled them from 1/8 to 1/10 (my standard working scale, so that all my models are the same relative size).

Then I started analyzing the drawings, and referring to the many photos I have gathered, I drew each component in isolation. (Except nuts and bolts). This helps me understand the construction before I start, and to plan how I am going to tackle the project.

At one stage I got VERY confused - not knowing what I had already drawn and what still needed to be drawn. I then decided to shade the drawn parts, and the rest obviously still had to be drawn.




I have noticed that the wagon Ken photographed is an earlier Studebaker model to the one Ivan Collins drew. The differences are slight, so Ken’s photos have still been invaluable filling in most of the missing pieces. There were so many variations, who’s to say which is the “right” one?





As you can see, there are many varieties.

At this point, I have managed to draw all parts except for the sprinkling mechanics. I simply cannot see what the parts look like, and how they fit in. I have questioned this and am discussing it in the “My evolution as a model builder thread”. Bill used to know Ivan Collins and remembers him building this one. Hopefully he can shed some light. Maybe Ken goes to the wagon again? Maybe many things… Any way, the sprinkler mechanics can wait till last.


Time taken so far: 19hrs 20minutes.

I suppose I now have almost all the parts drawn (except nuts and bolts and the sprinkler mechanics). I have also made a cutting list so as to limit the amount of waste. Now I can proceed with the actual building.

Next: I will start on the wheels because I find them to be the most tedious to make. (In fact, I HATE making wheels! )
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Last edited by Richard; 1st June 2008 at 09:28 AM. Reason: pictures not displaying correctly
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Old 1st June 2008, 02:29 PM
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That’s a great introduction to the progression of a model. It’s nice to have a bit of background and history to a vehicle.
I would be interested to know what your favorite wood is for model making; and if there is a native South African species that is equivalent to the Lime (Tilia europaea) that I use.

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Originally Posted by Richard View Post
Bearing in mind that (2) am a competitive cyclist (and training takes a lot of my time)
Not on that Draisine I hope!!

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Next: I will start on the wheels because I find them to be the most tedious to make. (In fact, I HATE making wheels! )
It’s the spokes, they are so repetitive and you feel you are not making progress!
But once you can look at a set of well-made wheels you have completed, you have a sense of satisfaction and can somehow visualize the coming together of a model.

P.S. I have e-mailed you two pictures of a Studebaker Sprinkling Wagon that you may not have.
They have a copyright which prevents me posting them directly to the forum. They are big jpeg’s and may take a while to download on your pc. Let me know if/when you get them.

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Old 1st June 2008, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard View Post
I have noticed that the wagon Ken photographed is an earlier Studebaker model to the one Ivan Collins drew. The differences are slight, so Ken’s photos have still been invaluable filling in most of the missing pieces. There were so many variations, who’s to say which is the “right” one?
Richard, What I have noticed, in research of the popcorn wagon and other wagons that each builder did not always build exact wagons, there were many variations of the same wagon. Much like the modern vehicle they start out with a basic product and the buyer could order different adaptations. Of all the Model D popcorn wagons I have seen so far no two were exactly alike. Then too back then there were after market adaptations that were made to a wagon for its own purpose and use.
I have a reprint of an International Harvester catalog which has farm machinery and wagons. in this catalog, as with many other catalogs of other companies, you could pick the undercarriage of you choice, add on the type of wheels and then the box design that would work best for you.

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At this point, I have managed to draw all parts except for the sprinkling mechanics. I simply cannot see what the parts look like, and how they fit in. I have questioned this and am discussing it in the “My evolution as a model builder thread”. Bill used to know Ivan Collins and remembers him building this one. Hopefully he can shed some light. Maybe Ken goes to the wagon again? Maybe many things… Any way, the sprinkler mechanics can wait till last.
You are asking me to remember back nearly fifty years I was barely thinking detailed modeling back then let alone remembering the details. Back then I was freshly married, living in tiny studio apartment and flat broke. Even so I managed to build car models from plans in Popular Mechanics plan books. I had an X-Acto knife, sand paper,finger nail files and tooth picks and model glue. With those I constructed my models from cardboard tablet backs and shirt collar stiffeners. ( I'm begenning to sound like my Grandpa)
I digress: In my years of looking at wagons and stuff i have seen many different configurations of water wagon sprinkler valves.

Could you post enlarged sections of the valves as drawn in Ivan's plans? Perhaps it will jog my memory and I can sort out a drawing of them for you.

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Old 1st June 2008, 11:51 PM
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For the valves check out Lunken Valve Co, Cincinnati, Ohio. They probably made the valves for the sprinkler wagon.
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Old 2nd June 2008, 06:19 AM
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Yes John, I DID indeed contact the Smithsonian. They did not have a clue as to what I was talking about. (ha-de-dar-har! Yeah right!)

I also contacted OHS. No reply.

But I have learnt from you guys to just tackle it, and if need be, modify as I need to . So I have indeed started and you can watch my progression thread for more details. (I just hope I don't give too much details!)

What would be a bonus, is for a model builder who has access to this vehicle (the same model - there are many), to go and measure and draw the bits I need (sprinkler mechanics). Unfortunately, there are apparently very few because they were all used up until they became totally useless. Besides, I don't know any model builder who has access to such a vehicle (hint-hint...)
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Old 2nd June 2008, 05:02 PM
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Gee thanks Bill! Here are the best pics I have, plus the extract from the plans. (50 years ago…!! Sorry, I have the flu, and my logic skipped out on me for a while….)








Here's a photo of the front showing the levers.





Please note: on the plans there is a mudguard that does not appear in the photos.

Forgive me if I am being forward by adding my own notes to the diagrams.



THANK YOU!!!
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Old 2nd June 2008, 05:23 PM
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I don't think the leaver turns the whole sprinkler valve as it is pretty solid braced in place, but I do believe it is connected to the outlet and may adjust the opening gap of the bottom plate to control the spray volume.

Look at you other posting, I have given a description of the valve as I remember it. I think you are very close and could probably built it but are not sure of yourself. My motto (long before Nike took it) is "JUST DO IT" I had it printed on my shop apron when I taught classes in making miniatures.
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Old 3rd June 2008, 03:52 PM
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Note: The material Ivan used for fire hose was woven fiberglass tubing used as heat protection in electronics and electric wire shielding. I do not know if it is still available but back then it could be purchased in rolls of various sizes.
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Old 4th June 2008, 03:46 AM
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Check Hansen Wheel and Wagon site I believe they are or have just finished restoring a sprinkler waggon, there may be some info to be obtained from them.

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Old 5th June 2008, 12:01 AM
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This is from Doug Hansens spring newsletter, different type of waggon.

One of our favorite shop projects has been the restoration of an F.C. Austin Sprinkler Wagon for Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site in Colorado Springs, CO. Andy Morris, site manager, showcases this unique vehicle in actual use on the streets of the Historic Site
Photo courtesy of Cynthia Holling-Morris "We feel tremendous pride in owning a one-of-a-kind F.C. Austin Sprinkler Wagon that has been restored to its original condition of more than a century ago. It is without question, that there is no wagon maker other than Hansen Wheel & Wagon Shop that could have done the work to the exacting standards that we demanded on this historic piece. Your expertise, patience, and willingness to do the job right have set you above the rest. We will not hesitate to recommend you to other museum professionals who may be in need of your first rate services." -Andy Morris, Manager, Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site

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