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Show and tell. This section has been included at the request of one of our members – Popsarsi, thanks pops! Display a picture or pictures of anything of interest and then tell us about it. Not how to make carrot cake or get stains out of your underwear, but things broadly related to our hobby! If you have one model or several models you have made then please post pictures of them in this section, along with information on the timbers you have used, how long it took to make the model, what scale is it made to, and the history and use of the vehicle – in fact anything of interest about the model! ~~ jraah ~~

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Old 25th September 2007, 07:35 AM
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Default Acton Scott Historic Working Farm 2006.

Saturday 17th June 2006 visit to Acton Scott Historic Working Farm.
Situated in the beautiful scenic area of the Shropshire Hills is the Acton Scott Historic Working Farm. This is one of Britain's leading working farm museums. The museum is part of what was once the Home Farm of the Acton Scott Estate. It was farmed to supply meat and other dairy products for the lord of the manor and his family who lived in Acton Hall.
The Working Farm regularly has practical demonstrations of historic farming using traditional skills and period horse-drawn machines. Every day you can see milking by hand and butter-making in the dairy. There are weekly visits from the wheelwright, farrier and blacksmith. In the woodsman's hut, rakes, gate hurdles and besom brooms are made.
The Guild of Model Wheelwrights are made very welcome there, and on Saturday 17th June I went along to see and take some pictures of the models displayed by Guild members, along with an intention of taking a few photos of some of the full size horse drawn vehicles on permanent display at the museum.

Click on each image to enlarge.
...One of the first vehicles on display was this delivery cart, which I think would make an attractive model, especially if the vendor's goods were made and displayed.

...This next vehicle is a Shropshire Waggon. Notice the double straked front and rear wheels.

...This lovely painted vehicle is a Gypsy Pot Waggon, made by Wrights Bros. It has been beautifully restored by Peter Ingram at considerable cost to the museum, but I have to say that the decoration and finish is exemplary! Notice that nearly every piece if timber is chamfered between each joint, then painted with the edge of each chamfer painted a contrasting colour.

......Another view of the Pot Waggon.

Three more pictures of the Pot Waggon.


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Old 18th October 2007, 03:06 PM
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That Gypsy Pot Waggon has got to be the best striped vehicle that I've yet to see! Whoever did all the pinstriping was a master at it, he must have enjoyed his work to achieve something like that.
Now, why was the name ' Pot Waggon ', given to that particular type of vehicle?
What sort of arrangement did they use to hold the wheels on the axles of the Pot Waggon, was it an axle nut with a split pin thru the nut, or some other sort of arrangement?
Why that odd shaped hub band, that is fitted to the wheels of this Pot Waggon?
Were these hub bands something perculiar to the gypsy waggons, or are they something to do with different waggon makers from different rural areas?
Is somebody from the Guild going to to a drawing of this particular vehicle to keep it's memory alive? This would definately be a fine and worthy addition to the Guild's library of drawings.
How about somebody/anybody from the Guild doing a model of that vehicle, it would have to be be a show stopper with all that pinstriping and different colours, reckon it would look a bit better on the table than all that John Thompson stuff being done and redone again and again. Just my ramblings, but is anyone from the Guild up to the challenge of giving it a whirl????

Sorry about all these questions, just an inquisitive mind after a few answers.


regards greenie

Last edited by greenie; 18th October 2007 at 03:14 PM.
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Old 18th October 2007, 03:31 PM
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Hi greenie,
I have to agree with you, the painting is the best I have ever seen on any full size vehicle. Peter Ingram is probably the best known Romani (or Romany) gypsy waggon painters and restores here in the UK (I believe he has also gone over to the USA a number of times to restore and paint vehicles there.) He once had a Romani Museum in Selborne. Hampshire, but this now no longer exists. I don't rightly know why it was called a 'Pot Waggon’. Many gypsies’ sold and repaired pots, pans and kettles, and would also solder these for their customers if required? Perhaps this is how it got its name!!

....The black and white picture of the Open Lot Caravan shown here was also painted by Peter Ingram. This type of caravan could be made by the travellers themselves, as they were built onto an existing traders dray, but the more elaborate types (as seen at the Acton Scott Museum) were always made by specialist builders. The hub band may be a particular feature of this vehicle as made by Wrights Bros. Have you noticed the screw in the hub band? The Open Lot Caravan had a Drabble type axle, i.e. separate castings for each wheel, which were clipped and bolted into the recessed axle bed. It had threaded nuts that held the nave to the axle, with a brass hub-cap fitted, but for some reason it also has a slot cut out of the nave, much like the Acton Scott vehicle!!

I would love to attempt to make and paint a model, but I don’t think I could do it as good as I would want to! I have seen a number of models of late that should not have got on the show bench, as the painting of them have been diabolical!! If I couldn't make a good job of it I would not attempt doing it, and I certainly would never display it!!



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Old 18th October 2007, 03:37 PM
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Thanks John for all that information, ALL the photos of the Pot Waggon have been saved to disc, never see anything like that again, especially over here in Aust.
Is there somebody/anybody that you know, who likes to do working drawings of horse drawn vehicles, if there is, point 'em in the direction of that Pot Waggon and tell 'em to get busy. Someone's just got to put all that detail down onto paper.

greenie
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Old 18th October 2007, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
How about somebody/anybody from the Guild doing a model of that vehicle, it would have to be be a show stopper with all that pinstriping and different colours, reckon it would look a bit better on the table than all that John Thompson stuff being done and redone again and again. Just my ramblings, but is anyone from the Guild up to the challenge of giving it a whirl????
How about GREENIE??? Can't think of a better candidate.

It would be a real challenge wouldn't it? If I had better use of my hands and nothing else to do I would take it on.
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Old 18th October 2007, 04:04 PM
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That Pot wagon is a must for modelling; although I don’t paint I think the chamfering on its own with a nice timber would be worth the effort, I agree with Radish, get some record of the wagon dimension ect, I can see this wagon is going to sit on our minds for a long time, how many models are we going to end up with?

Pops
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Old 18th October 2007, 04:21 PM
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Yes Bill, I have to agree…..greenie could make an outstanding job of that!

And here is just a little bit more information on the Gypsy Pot Waggon mentioned in this thread.

Looking through the pages of “The English Gypsy Caravan” it states the following – 'The four-wheeled tilted pot cart: the older name of this and of the two-wheeled kind is Potter’s Cart, from its use by Gypsies who, before the canals provided the potteries with their first hauled transportation, came to purchase, carry and hawk around the country cheap and faulty earthenware.’

I believe a set of plans are available, along with photographs, of the Gypsy Pot Wagon; these are available from the Guilds Library Plans and were drawn by Guild member Frank Rake who lives in Florida, USA. Frank has also completed a fine looking model.

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Old 18th October 2007, 04:41 PM
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Default pot wagon

One reason that I've been given for the name is that it was the type of cart used to collect the cheap decorated earthenware from the potteries.
Attached is a picture of Frank Rake's model, I can send a higher def version to anyone who wants it.
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File Type: jpg pot wagon.jpg (64.8 KB, 28 views)

Last edited by tedwin; 18th October 2007 at 06:45 PM.
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Old 18th October 2007, 08:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedwin View Post
One reason that I've been given for the name is that it was the type of cart used to collect the cheap decorated earthenware from the potteries.
Attached is a picture of Frank Rake's model, I can send a higher def version to anyone who wants it.
tedwin! A big welcome to the forum!
Thanks for that picture of Frank’s model; I would love to get him to post in here to tell us how he has achieved the finish! It looks like decals, but then again it could have been painted by hand!

Tell us a bit about yourself tedwin, are you working on a model at the moment?

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Old 18th October 2007, 09:10 PM
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Hi to All,
I have just had a look at the SMHDV site and checked out the MODEL GALLERY. For those that have not had a look lately, you better go check out the Ledge Caravan and the Gypsy Pot Waggon made by a Mr Frank Rake.
Just go to the two models towards the bottom of the page, have the tissues handy to wipe away any drool.

They are both extraordinarily well detailed models and thanks must be given to Frank Rake, for producing the drawings of the Pot Waggon and then unselfishly donating these drawings to the Guild of Model Wheelwrights lending library.

A truly wonderfull and very generous gift by this very talented person.

regards greenie
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